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Why doesn’t Ontario want health-care workers to be accountable?

Christie Blatchford, The National Post, The Ottawa Citizen

They do the most intimate of health-care jobs with the most vulnerable citizens: the elderly, the sick, the mentally ill, the disabled. If your old, sick dad needs a diaper change, it’s likely a personal support worker (PSW) who will do it. If your aging aunt needs help to go to the toilet, guess who will be helping her there. If your crabby, frightened mother has stopped eating, it’s a PSW who may try to convince her, and if she throws up after a few bites, it’s the same woman who will clean her up. For such glamorous work, PSWs in Ontario earn the princely sum of between $13.75 (private home care) to $19 an hour (for those working for publicly funded home care agencies): they really are the heavy lifters in health care. Yet PSWs remain entirely ungoverned, unlike just about every other health-care section, and in Ontario, they’ve been begging the government in vain for years for the tools to make themselves accountable.

Read the rest here:

http://nationalpost.com/opinion/christie-blatchford-why-doesnt-ontario-want-health-care-workers-to-be-accountable

Families know the problems of long-term care

Letter to the editor, The Citizen

I am writing on behalf of a grassroots group called Mind the Gap. We are six wives whose husbands have or had dementia. Five of us have personally experienced the problems in long-term care facilities, and have been actively lobbying politicians and organizations to improve conditions. Not everything about LTC is negative; most staff do an excellent job with the time they have for their residents and their families. However, you have exposed some serious issues of which most people are unaware.

Read the rest here:

http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/letters/todays-letters-families-know-the-problems-of-long-term-care

City’s care homes found non-compliant more than 200 times in five years

Drake Fenton and Alison Mah, The Ottawa Citizen

The four long-term care facilities run by the City of Ottawa have been found non-compliant with legislation governing long-term care homes more than 200 times over the past five years, including numerous incidents of patient abuse, a Citizen examination of provincial records shows. From 2012 to 2016, city-run facilities Garry J. Armstrong, Peter D. Clark, Centre d’Accueil Champlain and Carleton Lodge were found non-compliant 222 times. That number jumps to 260 when available data from 2017 is included.

Read the rest here:

https://www.google.ca/amp/ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/city-run-long-term-care-homes-found-non-compliant-more-than-200-times-in-last-5-years/amp?espv=1

Ontario issues rare order to Ottawa to improve failing long-term care homes

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

The City of Ottawa has been slapped with an “unheard of” blanket order from the province to improve safety and care at three of its four long-term care homes following a string of incidents, including the repeated punching of one resident by a caregiver and head injuries suffered by another resident that were later covered up. The “director referral order” from the provincial Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, is something rarely issued in Ontario and only in cases where there is a chronic history of non-compliance, which has been the case in Ottawa.

Read the rest here:

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/ontario-issues-rare-order-to-ottawa-to-improve-failing-long-term-care-homes

Ottawa personal support worker sounds alarm over long-term care

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

Ontario is setting up its long-term care system to fail because of a lack of funding, says an Ottawa personal support worker who says more people from inside the system need to speak up about what they are seeing. “Our government does not support long-term care. They may pretend to, but the reality is, they don’t, said Peter Dunnigan, who now works as a personal support worker visiting patients in their homes. Dunnigan said that, in his experience, more personal support workers are badly needed. He describe the “morning rush”, working on a long-term care ward as a personal support worker, and the experience of trying to get 16 or more residents ready for the day. “You can’t provide quality care in the morning rush,” he said. (PSWs) are stressed out, taking on more responsibilities and falling behind. It makes the environment toxic.”

Read the rest here:

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/ottawa-personal-support-worker-sounds-alarm-over-long-term-care

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