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Currently Browsing: Media Reports

Dying vet needed CPR
Hidden video shows his nurse laughing instead

The Washington Post, The Ottawa Citizen

By the late winter of 2014, James Dempsey had served in a world war, raised children, buried a wife and seen the best of his health behind him. As he prepared for a stay at a nursing home on the outskirts of Atlanta, the 89-year-old began to feel nervous. So his family hid a camera in his room at Northeast Atlanta Health and Rehabilitation, Dempsey’s son later told WSBTV. His father knew about it, he said, but the nurses didn’t. James Dempsey died in that room on Feb. 27, 2014, in front of the secret camera. What his family saw on the video made them sue the facility. Portions of the hidden video were aired this week by another news station, NBC 11Alive. The clips appear to show Dempsey gasping for air, begging for help and collapsing that morning while nurses barely attempt to revive him and at one point laugh over his bed.

Read the rest here:

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/world/a-dying-vet-needed-cpr-hidden-video-shows-his-nurse-laughing-instead/wcm/5cd89166-a389-4557-978f-5fa16291c7bf

No more for-profit nursing homes under an NDP government, Horwath says

David Reevely, The Ottawa Citizen

Ontario needs a lot more nursing homes run by local governments and non-profit groups, New Democratic Party leader Andrea Horwath says, instead of relying on profit-making private companies to fill in gaps left by public authorities. “They’re close to the community. They see what’s going on. So using community-based not-for-profit agencies as well as municipalities to be the deliverers of those services is something I see as being a priority,” Horwath said during an Ottawa swing this week. She spent part of it in the living room of NDP activist Emilie Taman in Old Ottawa South, hearing from people who have had loved ones living in long-term care homes. Five women, in fact, such as Doreen Rocque, whose husband Blake lived in long-term care for seven-and-a-half years because of his Parkinson’s. He had 70 falls — “seven-zero,” she emphasized — in six months at one point. Rocque is now the chair of the Champlain Region Family Council Network, representing all of the Eastern Ontario groups of relatives of nursing-home residents.

Read the rest here:
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/reevely-no-more-for-profit-nursing-homes-under-an-ndp-government-horwath-says

Former CEO of Perley-Rideau to review Ottawa’s city-run nursing homes

David Reevely, The Ottawa Citizen

A former chief executive of the Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre will review Ottawa’s city-owned nursing homes and tell the municipal government where they went wrong, city manager Steve Kanellakos announced Tuesday. Greg Fougère retired in 2013 after 17 years leading the facility, which expanded from a nursing home specializing in veterans to a “seniors’ village” with assisted-living apartments and programs based at the Perley-Rideau that serve people in their own homes. His job is to help the city’s four municipal nursing homes recover from scandalous stories of resident abuse and neglect: a personal-support worker who punched a disobedient man with dementia and pleaded guilty to assault; family members who say they’ve been barred from the homes after complaining about their loved ones’ treatment; a man left lying in his own blood after slipping out of his wheelchair in an incident a nurse hushed up. At the end of September, after spending a whole summer reeling and trying to rebuild faith in their operation, Kanellakos and the city’s social-services manager Janice Burelle fired three more workers after one of them was caught on a hidden recorder asking a resident why it was taking her so long to die and two others heard it and kept it to themselves. That’s when Kanellakos and Burelle said they’d bring in an expert to go over their system from top to bottom, as soon as they could find someone suitable.

Read the rest here:
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/former-ceo-of-perley-rideau-to-review-ottawas-city-run-nursing-homes

Family seeks answers after mother died in long-term care

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

Last year, after a happy Easter weekend with her family near Shawville, Rita Normoyle was taken back to her residence at Extendicare Laurier Manor in Ottawa. Five days later, the 84-year-old was dead. A year and a half and numerous investigations later, Diane Champoux os still waiting for answers about what led to her mother’s death on April 2, 2016. The death of Normoyle is one of the latest incidents being brought to light as the Citizen explores the state of this city’s nursing homes.

Read the rest here:
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/family-seeks-answers-after-mother-died-in-long-term-care

Cycling without Age: How a Danish bike fan brought pedal power to the elderly

Blair Crawford, The Ottawa Citizen

Even Ole Kassow thought he was crazy when he showed up unannounced at a Copenhagen nursing home on a three-wheeled rickshaw bike and offered to take anyone who wanted for a bike ride. Five years later, Cycling without Age is a worldwide phenomena, operating in 38 countries, including Canada, with the help of more than 10,000 volunteers. Total up the number of kilometres Kassow’s volunteer rickshaw “pilots” have pedalled their elderly passengers, and you have a journey three times around the world. “For me, cycling is part of my life. It’s part of what makes me happy,” Kassow said Wednesday as a keynote speaker at the Humanizing Health Care International Conference at the Fairmont Château Laurier. Kassow would often cycle past the nursing home on his way to work and saw residents sitting outdoors but immobile. One day, he borrowed the rickshaw and showed up at the desk with his offer. His first passenger was Gertrude, an elderly resident who asked him to pedal her down to the Copenhagen harbourfront. On the way she told Kassow about raising her family in Greenland and sailing to Denmark with her children for summer holidays.“When I came back I said, ‘That was amazing. All the stories I heard.’ And the staff said to me, ‘But Gertrude doesn’t talk …

Read the rest here:

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/cycling-without-age-how-a-danish-bike-fan-brought-pedal-power-to-the-elderly

Local connection to the story: Bruyère Continuing Care has two of the $9,000, Danish-built rickshaws in use at its Elisabeth Bruyère Hospital in downtown Ottawaand its Saint-Louis Résidence in Orléans.

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