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Top Stories 2018

October 27, 2018

Windows in poor repair not inspected regularly before woman with dementia fell to her death at Carlingview Manor

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

A senior woman with dementia, who was known to be an escape risk, fell head first to her death in April after easily removing the windows in her room at Carlingview Manor, according to a damning inspection report released by the province. It took the woman less than two minutes to take the windows from their frames at the long-term care home and plummet to the ground, according to security footage. The windows, which were supposed to open no more than 15 centimetres to prevent falls, were in poor repair, not inspected regularly and routinely removed by cleaning staff, sometimes in front of residents, the report from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care found. Cleaning staff could easily take the windows out of their frames without the help of special tools, according to the report, and sometimes had difficulty putting them back in securely. After the woman’s death, every accessible slider-style window in the eight-storey building was bolted shut.

Read the rest here:
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/windows-in-poor-repair-not-inspected-regularly-before-woman-with-dementia-fell-to-death-at-carlingview-manor

 

July 2, 2018

Six things we’ve learned so far at the Wettlaufer inquiry

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

After the first phase of the long-term care inquiry in Ontario, we circle back to see what we’ve learned from the testimony. The Public Inquiry into the Safety and Security of Residents in the Long-Term Care Homes System was called after Elizabeth Wettlaufer was sentenced to eight concurrent life terms in prison. The inquiry is currently on break until July 16 and is expected to wrap up in September. In September 2016, Wettlaufer, a registered nurse who worked in nursing homes and in people’s homes, confessed to injecting people with large amounts of insulin between 2007 and 2016, killing eight and harming six. The inquiry is examining how Wettlaufer’s crimes went undetected for so long and is looking at systemic problems with long-term care in Ontario.

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-what-we-ve-learned-so-far-1.4728733

 

June 22, 2018

Seniors and food: The dish on care home menus

Lori Culbert, Vancouver Sun

Chef Nader Tabesh stands inside a massive walk-in refrigerator, surrounded by 30 dozen eggs, a stack of salmon fillets, and boxes of fresh fruit and vegetables, as he gets ready to make dinner for 100 seniors at Burnaby’s Normanna care home. “For most people at care centres, the biggest challenge can be the food. So we make sure visually it has to be good, nutrition-wise it has to be proper, and the food has to be edible so residents enjoy the meal,” says Tabesh, whose company Angel Food Services provides three meals and two snacks a day for five seniors’ homes in Metro Vancouver. “When they are in the care centre, activities and food are the biggest part of their day.” But the meals at B.C.’s 300 care homes are likely to range from no-frills fare to home-cooked favourites, as revealed in a recent investigation by the B.C. seniors advocate, Isobel Mackenzie, which found large differences in how much money was spent on food. A home in White Rock had the cheapest food budget, spending just $4.92 a day to provide three meals and two snacks per resident. The average cost across the province was $8 a day — far less than the $10.21 spent on feeding inmates in provincial jails, Mackenzie said. If you are investigating care homes for yourself or a loved one, experts suggest you ask many questions about the meals: Are all four food groups included? Are they low in sodium and saturated fat? Are they cooked from scratch and not processed? Are the ingredients fresh and not from a can?

Read the rest here:
https://vancouversun.com/health/seniors/seniors-and-food-the-dish-on-care-home-menus-and-tips-for-cooking-alone-at-home

 

June 18, 2018

101-year-old woman says caregiver walloped her with a towel

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

Police and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care are investigating after a 101-year-old woman reported being “walloped” with a towel by a caregiver at her Ottawa long-term care home. Evelyn Dick told the head nurse at Extendicare Starwood last Thursday that a personal support worker hit her on the head with a towel and told her to go back to bed when she tried to get up at about 7:15 that morning. Officials at the long-term-care home contacted Dick’s daughter, Margaret Anthony, and told her they had reported the incident to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and to Ottawa police. When Anthony went to see her mother the next day, Dick told her it was not the first time she had been hit with a towel by the same personal support worker. “She does it all the time,” Anthony says her mother told her. “She does it to others too.”

Read the rest here:
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/101-year-old-woman-says-caregiver-walloped-her-with-a-towel

 

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