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Killer nurse abruptly quit job after narcotics went missing at long-term care home

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

Elizabeth Wettlaufer quit her job at Meadow Park Long-Term Care in London, Ont., the day after a large amount of narcotics went missing. She spent the weekend in hospital after overdosing, a public inquiry heard. Wettlaufer abruptly resigned from her job as a nurse at Meadow Park in late September 2014, saying she had an illness that prevented her from working as a nurse. That was less than a month after she’d killed Arpad Horvath, 75, at that nursing home. For the first time, the Wettlaufer inquiry has heard from a former employee of Meadow Park, the last place Wettlaufer is known to have killed someone in her care. She went on to injure others at subsequent jobs. 

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-public-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-1.4712027

101-year-old woman says caregiver walloped her with a towel

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

Police and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care are investigating after a 101-year-old woman reported being “walloped” with a towel by a caregiver at her Ottawa long-term care home. Evelyn Dick told the head nurse at Extendicare Starwood last Thursday that a personal support worker hit her on the head with a towel and told her to go back to bed when she tried to get up at about 7:15 that morning. Officials at the long-term-care home contacted Dick’s daughter, Margaret Anthony, and told her they had reported the incident to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and to Ottawa police. When Anthony went to see her mother the next day, Dick told her it was not the first time she had been hit with a towel by the same personal support worker. “She does it all the time,” Anthony says her mother told her. “She does it to others too.”

Read the rest here:
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/101-year-old-woman-says-caregiver-walloped-her-with-a-towel

Nurses union didn’t disclose Wettlaufer documents, public inquiry hears

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

The Ontario Nurses Association didn’t disclose documents from its defence of Elizabeth Wettlaufer when she was fired from her job at Caressant Care in Woodstock, Ont., in 2014. The union notified lawyers for the public inquiry this weekend that it accidentally left out documents relating to Wettlaufer’s dismissal. “When she was first arrested, the union locked their files electronically and when that happens they come off the system entirely,” ONA lawyer Nicole Butt told the inquiry. “The union was trying to do the right thing, but the result is that [the documents] were not disclosed. When I realized the documents were not in to [the public inquiry] document database, I immediately sent them” to commission lawyer Liz Hewitt. The documents are from January 2014, when Wettlaufer was fired from Caressant Care for making too many medication errors. 

The union grieved that termination. After some negotiation, Wettlaufer was given a $2,000 settlement, a reference letter and her termination was noted as a resignation. 

The documents that weren’t disclosed include handwritten notes from the labour relations officer and from Wettlaufer herself about the termination and the ongoing negotiations. 

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-public-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-1.4710487

Suspicious death at nursing home ruled natural:
New details in the death of Violet Lucas

Gary Dimmock – Ottawa Citizen

Staff at the nursing home where Violet Lucas was found dead, with her head wedged between her mattress and a guardrail, moved her body before the coroner arrived.

The investigating coroner could not view Lucas’s body as it was found at Extendicare Laurier Manor on Montreal Road and could not rely on photographs, either, because the staff didn’t take any before moving her body. The coroner has ruled that Lucas died a natural death after suffering cardiac arrest. Although the report sheds light on some of the circumstances surrounding her death, it also raises new questions and highlights discrepancies between what staff reported after finding Lucas dead and the official report into her death. When this newspaper first reported on the April 7, 2017 death of the single mother of seven, her family was still in the dark about the circumstances surrounding her death. They knew that she had been found dead in a precarious position and it was suspicious for several reasons. She couldn’t move around on her own, yet she was found half out of bed. And her bed alarm, the one that alerts staff if a resident is out of bed or moving to do so, wasn’t working because the batteries were faulty. Lucas was last seen alive at 10 p.m. on April 7, 2017. Staff checked on her 30 minutes later and found her dead. They didn’t try to revive her because she had a Do Not Resuscitate order. 

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http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/suspicious-death-at-nursing-home-ruled-natural-new-details-in-the-death-of-violet-lucas

Wettlaufer inquiry told co-workers “betrayed” by disgraced nurse who murdered patients

Inquiry in St. Thomas, ON, aims to re-establish trust in long-term care system, expected to last 9 weeks

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

The opening day of the public inquiry into the actions of Elizabeth Wettlaufer, who admitted to killing nursing home patients over a period of years, heard from lawyers representing Ontario long-term care homes who said her co-workers were betrayed by the disgraced nurse.”A group of health-care providers were utterly betrayed by a fellow registered nurse who was supposedly working side by side, or so they thought, to accomplish the same goals of providing quality care,” said David Golden, lawyer for Carresent Care, the Woodstock facility where Wettlaufer committed her first murder. The Long-Term Care Homes Public Inquiry, established on Aug. 1, 2017, after Wettlaufer was sentenced to eight concurrent life terms, is headed by Justice Eileen Gillese. It’s set to hear from 17 parties over nine weeks. Tuesday’s first day began with introductory statements from a number of witnesses, long-term care agencies and regulatory bodies. Gillese opening the inquiry by saying it will aim to re-establish trust in a system that failed Ontarians.

Read the rest here:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/st-thomas-ontario-nurse-elizabeth-wettlaufer-public-inquiry-day-1-1.4690873

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