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Currently Browsing: Media Reports

When it comes to medication, less is more

Wanda Morris, The National Post

Unless we’ve been incredibly healthy, we’re all familiar with the side effects of medication. We may take a drug to relieve pain, itching or heart attack risks, and end up drowsy, pudgy and unable to operate heavy machinery. We typically accept those consequences as a small price for the relief of our original problem. But we may not realize that taking more than one drug at the same time – or taking supplements in addition to medication – leaves us at risk of side effects from the interactions between them. The consequences may be severe.

Read the rest here:
https://nationalpost.com/health/seniors/grey-matters-when-it-comes-to-medication-less-is-more-2

Six things we’ve learned so far at the Wettlaufer inquiry

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

After the first phase of the long-term care inquiry in Ontario, we circle back to see what we’ve learned from the testimony. The Public Inquiry into the Safety and Security of Residents in the Long-Term Care Homes System was called after Elizabeth Wettlaufer was sentenced to eight concurrent life terms in prison. The inquiry is currently on break until July 16 and is expected to wrap up in September. In September 2016, Wettlaufer, a registered nurse who worked in nursing homes and in people’s homes, confessed to injecting people with large amounts of insulin between 2007 and 2016, killing eight and harming six. The inquiry is examining how Wettlaufer’s crimes went undetected for so long and is looking at systemic problems with long-term care in Ontario.

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-what-we-ve-learned-so-far-1.4728733

Seniors and food: The dish on care home menus

Lori Culbert, Vancouver Sun

Chef Nader Tabesh stands inside a massive walk-in refrigerator, surrounded by 30 dozen eggs, a stack of salmon fillets, and boxes of fresh fruit and vegetables, as he gets ready to make dinner for 100 seniors at Burnaby’s Normanna care home. “For most people at care centres, the biggest challenge can be the food. So we make sure visually it has to be good, nutrition-wise it has to be proper, and the food has to be edible so residents enjoy the meal,” says Tabesh, whose company Angel Food Services provides three meals and two snacks a day for five seniors’ homes in Metro Vancouver. “When they are in the care centre, activities and food are the biggest part of their day.” But the meals at B.C.’s 300 care homes are likely to range from no-frills fare to home-cooked favourites, as revealed in a recent investigation by the B.C. seniors advocate, Isobel Mackenzie, which found large differences in how much money was spent on food. A home in White Rock had the cheapest food budget, spending just $4.92 a day to provide three meals and two snacks per resident. The average cost across the province was $8 a day — far less than the $10.21 spent on feeding inmates in provincial jails, Mackenzie said. If you are investigating care homes for yourself or a loved one, experts suggest you ask many questions about the meals: Are all four food groups included? Are they low in sodium and saturated fat? Are they cooked from scratch and not processed? Are the ingredients fresh and not from a can?

Read the rest here:
https://vancouversun.com/health/seniors/seniors-and-food-the-dish-on-care-home-menus-and-tips-for-cooking-alone-at-home

Psychological burden on caring for dementia at home can be huge

Kevin Griffin, The Vancouver Sun

By all accounts, Dorothy Housden has an ideal situation for someone living with dementia.

She’s in a bright and spacious ground floor suite in a house with her son Bill and his wife Mila Coutinho living above. Dorothy’s bedroom has a high enough ceiling to hold a sleek lift above her hospital bed, which is covered with one of her gorgeous black and patterned hand made quilts. Although the doorways are a tight squeeze, Bill or Mila can push Dorothy’s wheelchair out to the ground-floor deck in the backyard. If it’s sunny and warm, Dorothy, 86, can sit beneath the grape vines watching for chickadees. Dorothy’s new digs are a recent change. She used to be upstairs but when her ability to walk deteriorated, the stairs became a barrier.

Read the rest here:
https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/psychological-burden-on-caring-for-dementia-at-home-can-be-huge

Seniors care in BC: Dementia wave set to make institutions more responsive to residents

Kevin Griffin, The Vancouver Sun

Erna Dreger held out as long as she could. She kept her husband Paul out of the seniors care system for nine years, caring for him at home after he was diagnosed in 2003 with early onset Alzheimer’s disease. But Paul, now 80, liked to go for walks by himself. Erna realized his wandering had become dangerous when he got lost and she had to call in police to find him.

“I knew I had to be smart before something tragic happened,” said Erna, 77.

Read the rest here:

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/seniors-care-in-b-c-dementia-wave-set-to-make-institutions-more-responsive-to-residents

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