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Currently Browsing: Media Reports

This was win-win: The Perley and Algonquin College create joint PSW Program

Joanne Laucius, The Ottawa Citizen

Valerie Little had a background in sales. She had quit work and was caring for her mother at home when a visiting personal support worker planted the seed of an idea for a mid-life career change. “You’re good at this. You should think about doing it,” the PSW urged Little. Little, 53, did think about it. In January, she was among the first graduates of a joint program between Algonquin College and the Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre, the first of its kind in Ottawa. The Perley offers the learning space for the PSW students, which includes a classroom located in a renovated dining room at the centre. The students get to be immersed in the learning experience. There’s another benefit for the Perley — in an environment where supply of PSWs does not meet demand, it has a home-gown crop of potential workers. Among its roles, the Perley offers assistance to patients in their homes, and it has assisted living apartments and long-term care services. They all require PSWs. Out of the 20 graduates, eight were hired by the Perley.

Read the rest here:
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/this-was-win-win-the-perley-and-algonquin-college-create-joint-psw-program

Prohibiting assisted dying does more harm than good

Wanda Morris, The National Post

Thanks to a Supreme Court of Canada ruling in 2015 and subsequent federal legislation, Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) is now legal in Canada. While the legalization of assisted dying had overwhelming public support (84 per cent in favour) among both CARP members and the general public, many in palliative care, such as Nancy Macey, executive director of the Delta Hospice Society in B.C., have gone on record as saying it is undermining their ability to provide end-of-life care and want nothing to do with it.

Read the rest here:
https://nationalpost.com/health/seniors/grey-matters-prohibiting-assisted-dying-does-more-harm-than-good

When it comes to medication, less is more

Wanda Morris, The National Post

Unless we’ve been incredibly healthy, we’re all familiar with the side effects of medication. We may take a drug to relieve pain, itching or heart attack risks, and end up drowsy, pudgy and unable to operate heavy machinery. We typically accept those consequences as a small price for the relief of our original problem. But we may not realize that taking more than one drug at the same time – or taking supplements in addition to medication – leaves us at risk of side effects from the interactions between them. The consequences may be severe.

Read the rest here:
https://nationalpost.com/health/seniors/grey-matters-when-it-comes-to-medication-less-is-more-2

Six things we’ve learned so far at the Wettlaufer inquiry

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

After the first phase of the long-term care inquiry in Ontario, we circle back to see what we’ve learned from the testimony. The Public Inquiry into the Safety and Security of Residents in the Long-Term Care Homes System was called after Elizabeth Wettlaufer was sentenced to eight concurrent life terms in prison. The inquiry is currently on break until July 16 and is expected to wrap up in September. In September 2016, Wettlaufer, a registered nurse who worked in nursing homes and in people’s homes, confessed to injecting people with large amounts of insulin between 2007 and 2016, killing eight and harming six. The inquiry is examining how Wettlaufer’s crimes went undetected for so long and is looking at systemic problems with long-term care in Ontario.

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-what-we-ve-learned-so-far-1.4728733

Seniors and food: The dish on care home menus

Lori Culbert, Vancouver Sun

Chef Nader Tabesh stands inside a massive walk-in refrigerator, surrounded by 30 dozen eggs, a stack of salmon fillets, and boxes of fresh fruit and vegetables, as he gets ready to make dinner for 100 seniors at Burnaby’s Normanna care home. “For most people at care centres, the biggest challenge can be the food. So we make sure visually it has to be good, nutrition-wise it has to be proper, and the food has to be edible so residents enjoy the meal,” says Tabesh, whose company Angel Food Services provides three meals and two snacks a day for five seniors’ homes in Metro Vancouver. “When they are in the care centre, activities and food are the biggest part of their day.” But the meals at B.C.’s 300 care homes are likely to range from no-frills fare to home-cooked favourites, as revealed in a recent investigation by the B.C. seniors advocate, Isobel Mackenzie, which found large differences in how much money was spent on food. A home in White Rock had the cheapest food budget, spending just $4.92 a day to provide three meals and two snacks per resident. The average cost across the province was $8 a day — far less than the $10.21 spent on feeding inmates in provincial jails, Mackenzie said. If you are investigating care homes for yourself or a loved one, experts suggest you ask many questions about the meals: Are all four food groups included? Are they low in sodium and saturated fat? Are they cooked from scratch and not processed? Are the ingredients fresh and not from a can?

Read the rest here:
https://vancouversun.com/health/seniors/seniors-and-food-the-dish-on-care-home-menus-and-tips-for-cooking-alone-at-home

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