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Crying out for care

Marketplace, CBC, featuring David Common
www.cbc.ca/marketplace/

As a continuation of its two-year investigation, the CBC’s Marketplace goes undercover in this episode to see what life is really like for our loved ones inside long-term care facilities. The program follows one daughter who installed a hidden camera in her mother’s room, and uncovered the truth about how her mother really died. The CBC’s hidden camera investigation concluded that these facilities are still understaffed and its front line workers are overworked. Although Premier Ford recently  announced that the Ontario Government will add 15,000 new beds for long-term care over the next five years, 30,000 in ten years, he did not elaborate on who will care for those new beds in facilities where family members find the conditions unacceptable, and staff workers continue to be set up to fail. At this press conference, newly appointed health minister, Christine Elliott, said that she takes the concerns of all front line workers very seriously, and she added that her department is conducting a human resource review.

You can watch the video here:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=CppkSWRdVTo

Ontario’s chief coroner faces scrutiny at Wettlaufer inquiry

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

The province’s chief coroner says some long-term care homes are still submitting death records by fax, instead of electronically, forcing a four-year delay in his office’s planned data analysis. Dr. Dirk Huyer said his office has been ready to analyze deaths in long-term care homes since 2014, but hasn’t been able to because death records are being sent in different formats. To analyze just the electronic records would lead to incomplete and incorrect data analysis, he said. “It defeats the purpose of an analytics model of trying to identify patterns,” Huyer said. It’s unclear if such an analysis may have found a pattern of problems with patient deaths under nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer’s care. 

Wettlaufer admitted to killing eight patients in southwestern Ontario by injecting them with massive amounts of insulin. The Wettlaufer inquiry, which resumed Monday after a two-week break, is hearing from the coroner’s office. It’s trying to determine what systemic problems led to Wettlaufer being able to get away with the murders undetected.

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-alex-van-kralingen-1.4745402https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-alex-van-kralingen-1.4745402

Six things we’ve learned so far at the Wettlaufer inquiry

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

After the first phase of the long-term care inquiry in Ontario, we circle back to see what we’ve learned from the testimony. The Public Inquiry into the Safety and Security of Residents in the Long-Term Care Homes System was called after Elizabeth Wettlaufer was sentenced to eight concurrent life terms in prison. The inquiry is currently on break until July 16 and is expected to wrap up in September. In September 2016, Wettlaufer, a registered nurse who worked in nursing homes and in people’s homes, confessed to injecting people with large amounts of insulin between 2007 and 2016, killing eight and harming six. The inquiry is examining how Wettlaufer’s crimes went undetected for so long and is looking at systemic problems with long-term care in Ontario.

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-what-we-ve-learned-so-far-1.4728733

Lack of insulin tracking at care home where Wettlaufer worked allowed for abuse

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

Insulin was easily accessible to nursing staff at Meadow Park Long-Term Care in London, Ont., where killer nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer found her last victim, the home’s former co-director of care testified Wednesday. And nurses were free to administer insulin without a double-check by a colleague, because the layout of the home made it impractical for two people to do so, Melanie Smith told the public inquiry into resident safety at long-term care homes. 

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-long-term-care-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-1.4713783

Killer nurse abruptly quit job after narcotics went missing at long-term care home

Kate Dubinski, CBC News

Elizabeth Wettlaufer quit her job at Meadow Park Long-Term Care in London, Ont., the day after a large amount of narcotics went missing. She spent the weekend in hospital after overdosing, a public inquiry heard. Wettlaufer abruptly resigned from her job as a nurse at Meadow Park in late September 2014, saying she had an illness that prevented her from working as a nurse. That was less than a month after she’d killed Arpad Horvath, 75, at that nursing home. For the first time, the Wettlaufer inquiry has heard from a former employee of Meadow Park, the last place Wettlaufer is known to have killed someone in her care. She went on to injure others at subsequent jobs. 

Read the rest here:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/ontario-public-inquiry-elizabeth-wettlaufer-1.4712027

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