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With a looming aging crisis, who is helping the caregivers?

The Globe and Mail, Zosia Bielski

Elder care leaves families stressed, exhausted and looking for help, a challenge particularly felt by women. A patchwork of hospital programs, government supports and online communities shows a way forward. Nearly half the population has cared for an aging, ill or disabled family member or friend at some point, according to the latest data from Statistics Canada. Informal caregivers contributed $26-billion in free labour to the health-care system annually, a 2009 study found. More than half of Canadian carers nursed a loved one for more than four years and many of them faced substantial out-of-pocket expenses while struggling in their careers: 43 per cent missed work, 15 per cent cut down their hours and 10 per cent passed up a promotion or new job, according to Statistics Canada. Women particularly face this challenge, since more of the daily tasks of giving care still fall to them

Read the rest here:
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-with-a-looming-aging-crisis-who-is-helping-the-caregivers/https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-with-a-looming-aging-crisis-who-is-helping-the-caregivers/

Crying out for care

Marketplace, CBC, featuring David Common
www.cbc.ca/marketplace/

As a continuation of its two-year investigation, the CBC’s Marketplace goes undercover in this episode to see what life is really like for our loved ones inside long-term care facilities. The program follows one daughter who installed a hidden camera in her mother’s room, and uncovered the truth about how her mother really died. The CBC’s hidden camera investigation concluded that these facilities are still understaffed and its front line workers are overworked. Although Premier Ford recently  announced that the Ontario Government will add 15,000 new beds for long-term care over the next five years, 30,000 in ten years, he did not elaborate on who will care for those new beds in facilities where family members find the conditions unacceptable, and staff workers continue to be set up to fail. At this press conference, newly appointed health minister, Christine Elliott, said that she takes the concerns of all front line workers very seriously, and she added that her department is conducting a human resource review.

You can watch the video here:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=CppkSWRdVTo

Ontario drafting plans to create super agency to run health care

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

Ontario needs a more centralized and integrated health-care system as it copes with growing demographic challenges, a premier’s council charged with ending hallway medicine says in its first report. The initial report from the council headed by retired hospital CEO Dr. Reuben Devlin was released Thursday. It doesn’t contain specific recommendations, but sketches a future of health care in Ontario that likely does not include the current regionalized system of LHINs (Local Health Integration Networks), that is leaner and that is centrally controlled.

Read the rest here:
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/premiers-council-sets-stage-for-more-centralized-leaner-health-care-in-ontario

Questionable care:
Groundbreaking lawsuit against nursing home chains

CTV News, W5, Sandie Rinaldo, investigative reporter

Long-suffering families fight to get the care they say their loved ones were promised but never received. W5’s Sandie Rinaldo continues her investigation into senior care in Canada, and reveals an unprecedented groundbreaking legal action about to be launched against three of Canada’s top for-profit long-term care providers (Extendicare, Revera and Sienna).

Watch the 25-minute video here:
https://www.longwoods.com/audio-video/Shorts/Youtube/8046

or subscribe here to watch more investigative reports on this topic:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/w5/

Long-term care homes want an end to mandatory inspections

Elizabeth Payne, The Ottawa Citizen

Ontario’s long-term care homes are pressing the Ontario government to get rid of mandatory annual inspections as part of its focus on cutting red tape. Groups that represent the province’s long-term care homes have long asked for an end to annual inspections for all long-term care homes and reducing regulations that they say place an undue burden on an already stressed sector. The head of one of two major organizations says she is optimistic the province is listening to those concerns. It is a possibility that worries Jane Meadus, staff lawyer and the institutional advocate with the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly. Regulations covering long-term care homes are there for a reason — in some cases because of previous harm done to residents — said Meadus. “Inspecting long term care homes that provide care to vulnerable seniors is not red tape. It is something that is necessary.”

Read the rest here:
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/long-term-care-homes-want-end-to-mandatory-inspections

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